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A Grammar of the Arabic Language (two volumes in one)A Grammar of the Arabic Language (two volumes in one)
B
y Carl Paul Caspari
William Wright (Translator)
Michael Jan de Goeje (Editor)
$32.95 paperback

A Grammar of the
Arabic Language is a detailed Arabic grammar tutorial, originally written in German by Carl Caspari and translated by British Orientalist William Wright. Often referred to today as Wright's Grammar, the second edition was altered and added to by Wright, and this third (and original final) edition was edited by famous Orientalists M.J. de Goeje and W. Robertson Smith. Wright consulted numerous Arabic sources when making additions and corrections to the work, and as such it is still useful today to students of the Arabic language.


A Literary History of the ArabsA Literary History of the Arabs
By R.A. Nicholson
$33.99 hardcover; $19.99 paperback

A compilation of the history of Islamic authors and writings, A Literary History of the
Arabs
is considered one of the best explanations of Arabic culture and literature today. R.A. Nicholson explains in the book's preface that Islamic literature contains within it references to figureheads and cultural understandings that would stump all English readers unaware of Arabic history and beliefs. Nicholson outlines within all the necessary information to begin understanding English translations of Arabic works. Written for students, the political, intellectual, and religious notions presented are useful for any modern study of Arabic literature.


An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. I: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. I: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources
By Edward W. Lane and Stanley Lane-Poole
$44.99 hardcover; $24.95 paperback

Compiled over many years in the 1800s by Edward William Lane, The Arabic-English Lexicon is a massive Arabic-English dictionary based on several medieval Arabic dictionaries, mainly the Taj al-'Arus, or "Crown of the Bride" by al-Zabidi, also written in the 19th century. The Lexicon
consists only of Book I, the dictionary; Book II was to contain rare words and explanations, but Lane died before its completion. After his death, Dr. G.P. Badger described Lane's lexicon: "This marvelous work in its fullness and richness, its deep research, correctness and simplicity of arrangement far transcends the Lexicon of any language ever presented to the world." Presented here in eight volumes, this work is one of the most concise and comprehensive Arabic-English dictionaries to date. Volume I includes a Preface by the author, a Postscript to the Preface, and Book I of the dictionary, which includes the first through the fourth letters of the Arabic alphabet, categorized by Arabic, rather than English, characters.


An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. II: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. II: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)
By Edward W. Lane and Stanley Lane-Poole
$64.95 hardcover; $24.95 paperback

Compiled over many years in the 1800s by Edward William Lane, The Arabic-English Lexicon is a massive Arabic-English dictionary based on several medieval Arabic dictionaries, mainly the Taj al-'Arus, or "Crown of the Bride" by al-Zabidi, also written in the 19th century. The Lexicon consists only of Book I, the dictionary; Book II was to contain rare words and explanations, but Lane died before its completion. After his death,
Dr. G.P. Badger described Lane's lexicon: "This marvelous work in its fullness and richness, its deep research, correctness and simplicity of arrangement far transcends the Lexicon of any language ever presented to the world." Presented here in eight volumes, this work is one of the most concise and comprehensive Arabic-English dictionaries to date. Volume II continues Book I of the dictionary, which includes the fifth through the seventh letters of the Arabic alphabet, categorized by Arabic, rather than English, characters.


An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. III: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. III: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)
By Edward W. Lane and Stanley Lane-Poole
$44.99 hardcover; $24.99 paperback

Compiled over many years in the 1800s by Edward William Lane, The Arabic-English Lexicon is a massive Arabic-English dictionary based on several medieval Arabic dictionaries, mainly the Taj al-'Arus, or "Crown of the Bride" by al-Zabidi, also written in the 19th century. The Lexicon consists only of Book I, the dictionary; Book II was to contain rare words and explanations, but Lane died before its completion. After his death, Dr. G.P. Badger described Lane's lexicon: "This marvelous work in its fullness and richness, its deep research, correctness and simplicity of arrangement far transcends the Lexicon of any language ever presented to the world." Presented here in eight volumes, this work is one of the most concise and comprehensive Arabic-English dictionaries to date. Volume III continues Book I of the dictionary, which includes the eighth through the eleventh letters of the Arabic alphabet, categorized by Arabic, rather than English, characters.


An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. IV: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. IV: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)
By Edward W. Lane and Stanley Lane-Poole
$44.99 hardcover; $24.99 paperback

Compiled over many years in the 1800s by Edward William Lane, The Arabic-English Lexicon is a massive Arabic-English dictionary based on several medieval Arabic dictionaries, mainly the Taj al-'Arus, or "Crown of the Bride" by al-Zabidi, also written in the 19th century. The Lexicon consists only of Book I, the dictionary; Book II was to contain rare words and explanations, but Lane died before its completion. After his death, Dr. G.P. Badger described Lane's lexicon: "This marvelous work in its fullness and richness, its deep research, correctness and simplicity of arrangement far transcends the Lexicon of any language ever presented to the world." Presented here in eight volumes, this work is one of the most concise and comprehensive Arabic-English dictionaries to date. Volume IV continues Book I of the dictionary, which includes the twelfth through the fourteenth letters of the Arabic alphabet, categorized by Arabic, rather than English, characters.


 An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. V: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. V: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)
By Edward W. Lane and Stanley Lane-Poole
$44.99 hardcover; $24.99 paperback

Compiled over many years in the 1800s by Edward William Lane, The Arabic-English Lexicon is a massive Arabic-English dictionary based on several medieval Arabic dictionaries, mainly the Taj al-'Arus, or "Crown of the Bride" by al-Zabidi, also written in the 19th century. The Lexicon consists only of Book I, the dictionary; Book II was to contain rare words and explanations, but Lane died before its completion. After his death, Dr. G.P. Badger described Lane's lexicon: "This marvelous work in its fullness and richness, its deep research, correctness and simplicity of arrangement far transcends the Lexicon of any language ever presented to the world." Presented here in eight volumes, this work is one of the most concise and comprehensive Arabic-English dictionaries to date. Volume V continues Book I of the dictionary, which includes the twelfth through the fourteenth letters of the Arabic alphabet, categorized by Arabic, rather than English, characters.


An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. VI: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. VI: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)
By Edward W. Lane and Stanley Lane-Poole
$44.99 hardcover; $24.99 paperback

Compiled over many years in the 1800s by Edward William Lane, The Arabic-English Lexicon is a massive Arabic-English dictionary based on several medieval Arabic dictionaries, mainly the Taj al-'Arus, or "Crown of the Bride" by al-Zabidi, also written in the 19th century. The Lexicon consists only of Book I, the dictionary; Book II was to contain rare words and explanations, but Lane died before its completion. After his death, Dr. G.P. Badger described Lane's lexicon: "This marvelous work in its fullness and richness, its deep research, correctness and simplicity of arrangement far transcends the Lexicon of any language ever presented to the world." Presented here in eight volumes, this work is one of the most concise and comprehensive Arabic-English dictionaries to date. Volume VI continues Book I of the dictionary, which includes the twelfth through the fourteenth letters of the Arabic alphabet, categorized by Arabic, rather than English, characters.


An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. VII: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. VII: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)
By Edward W. Lane and Stanley Lane-Poole
$44.99 hardcover; $24.99 paperback

Compiled over many years in the 1800s by Edward William Lane, The Arabic-English Lexicon is a massive Arabic-English dictionary based on several medieval Arabic dictionaries, mainly the Taj al-'Arus, or "Crown of the Bride" by al-Zabidi, also written in the 19th century. The Lexicon consists only of Book I, the dictionary; Book II was to contain rare words and explanations, but Lane died before its completion. After his death, Dr. G.P. Badger described Lane's lexicon: "This marvelous work in its fullness and richness, its deep research, correctness and simplicity of arrangement far transcends the Lexicon of any language ever presented to the world." Presented here in eight volumes, this work is one of the most concise and comprehensive Arabic-English dictionaries to date. Volume VII continues Book I of the dictionary, which includes the twelfth through the fourteenth letters of the Arabic alphabet, categorized by Arabic, rather than English, characters.


An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. VIII: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)An Arabic-English Lexicon (in eight volumes), Vol. VIII: Derived from the best and the most copious Eastern sources (Arabic Edition)
By Edward W. Lane and Stanley Lane-Poole
$44.99 hardcover; $24.99 paperback

Compiled over many years in the 1800s by Edward William Lane, The Arabic-English Lexicon is a massive Arabic-English dictionary based on several medieval Arabic dictionaries, mainly the Taj al-'Arus, or "Crown of the Bride" by al-Zabidi, also written in the 19th century. The Lexicon consists only of Book I, the dictionary; Book II was to contain rare words and explanations, but Lane died before its completion. After his death, Dr. G.P. Badger described Lane's lexicon: "This marvelous work in its fullness and richness, its deep research, correctness and simplicity of arrangement far transcends the Lexicon of any language ever presented to the world." Presented here in eight volumes, this work is one of the most concise and comprehensive Arabic-English dictionaries to date. Volume VIII continues Book I of the dictionary, which includes the twelfth through the fourteenth letters of the Arabic alphabet, categorized by Arabic, rather than English, characters.


Songs of KabîrSongs of Kabir
B
y Kabir
Rabindranath Tagore (Translator)
Evelyn Underhill (Introduction)
$16.99 hardcover; $6.99 paperback

Songs of
Kabir, translated into English and published by The India Society in 1914, is a selection of songs from the Hindu mystic Kabir which promotes his teachings of love, joy, and beauty. A progressive thinker for his time and a married man who lived a common life, Kabir sang of harmony between all peoples and attaining oneness with God. Considered heretical by Hindus and Muslims because of its rejection of organized religion, the Songs of Kabir give an interesting look into mystic ideals and culture.


The Masnavi: The Spiritual Couplets of Mauláná Jalálud-din Muhammad RúmíThe Masnavi: The Spiritual Couplets of Mauláná Jalálud-din Muhammad Rúmí
By Jalal ad-Dīn Muḥammad Rumi
E. H. Whinfield (Translator)
$12.99 paperback

The
Masnavi, written by Mawlana Jalal Al-Din Muhammad Rumi at age 54 in 1258 until his death in 1273, is one of the most famous and best-loved Sufi texts ever written. Comprised of six books and over 25,000 verses, The Masnavi is a collection of poems and stories that teaches Sufis how to reach their Union with God. Rumi described the book as "the roots of the roots of the roots of the Faith." Filled to the brim with stories, anecdotes, lessons, and beautiful poetry, this version of The Masnavi contains the six books abridged, and was translated by E.H. Whinfield in 1898.


The Secrets of the Self The Secrets of the Self
B
y Muhammad Iqbal
R. A. Nicholson (Translator, Introduction)
$12.95 paperback

The Secrets of the Self is a book-length, philosophical poem rooted in metaphysical thought and ideology, as well as Islamic theology. Originally published in 1915, the poem speaks of the "Self" in relation to the universe, how it is the inner power and soul of each individual human. It instructs on how to improve the Self through Love and willpower, which can then help one control the forces within the universe. The poem includes stories that illustrate its points and promotes the spread of Islamic ideals.